Traduzca Witchcraft para Inglés

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witchery, sorcery, magic; charm


Generally, the use of amulets (or talismans), magical "potions," magical rituals, and/or spells. For example, The Complete Book of Magic and Witchcraft (1980) describes a "cure" for jaundice: "12 large earthworms, baked on a shovel and ground to powder, drunk in potion." The author, Kathryn Paulsen, added parenthetically: "Somewhat poisonous effects have been noticed from this recipe." For madness, she recommended consuming a drink containing mild honey and salt--before sunrise and from a seashell; and for strength, a black spider between two slices of buttered bread.

witchcraft
\witch"craft`\ (?), n. [as. wiccecr?ft.]
1. the practices or art of witches; sorcery; enchantments; intercourse with evil spirits.
2. power more than natural; irresistible influence. he hath a witchcraft over the king in 's tongue.
witchcraft
n : the art of sorcery [syn: witchery]


witchcraft
(1 sam. 15:23; 2 kings 9:22; 2 chr. 33:6; micah 5:12; nahum 3:4; gal. 5:20). in the popular sense of the word no mention is made either of witches or of witchcraft in scripture. the "witch of en-dor" (1 sam. 28) was a necromancer, i.e., one who feigned to hold converse with the dead. the damsel with "a spirit of divination" (acts 16:16) was possessed by an evil spirit, or, as the words are literally rendered, "having a spirit, a pithon." the reference is to the heathen god apollo, who was regarded as the god of prophecy.


According to law books of the Middle Ages, the act of invoking evil spirits or consulting, covenanting with, entertaining, employing, feeding, or rewarding any evil spirit. - (read more on Witchcraft)
  

Witchcraft (also called witchery or spellcraft) broadly means the practice of, and belief in, magical skills and abilities that are able to be exercised individually by designated social groups, or by persons with the necessary esoteric secret knowledge. Witchcraft is a complex concept that varies culturally and societally; therefore, it is difficult to define with precision and cross-cultural assumptions about the meaning or significance of the term should be applied with caution. Witchcraft often occupies a religious, divinatory or medicinal role, and is often present within societies and groups whose cultural framework includes a magical world view. Although witchcraft can often share common ground with related concepts such as sorcery, the paranormal, magic, superstition, necromancy, possession, shamanism, healing, spiritualism, nature worship and the occult, it is usually seen as distinct from these when examined by sociologists and anthropologists.

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Noun
1. the art of sorcery
(synonym) witchery
(hypernym) sorcery, black magic, black art, necromancy


The practice of spells and magick, often involving the worship of many deities or a supreme God and/or Goddess.

a religion or practice followed by a Witch. It has so many meanings that it should be used with great care (or preferably never at all) in order to avoid confusion.

Fear of being severely punished or beaten by a rod, or of being severely criticized
Fear of magic(wand) Wiccaphobia: Fear of witches and witchcraft

A religion centered around the dual worship of the Goddess, a female supreme deity, and a God, a male supreme deity. Witches venerate the life forces in nature and seek to be in tune with natural cycles. Witchcraft is not Satanism.

(n.)
The practices or art of witches; sorcery; enchantments; intercourse with evil spirits.
   (n.)
Power more than natural; irresistible influence.
  

School for wizard students ages 11-17; probably located in Scotland.

Sorcery.

(1 Sam. 15:23; 2 Kings 9:22; 2 Chr. 33:6; Micah 5:12; Nahum 3:4; Gal. 5:20). In the popular sense of the word no mention is made either of witches or of witchcraft in Scripture. The "witch of En-dor" (1 Sam. 28) was a necromancer, i.e., one who feigned to hold converse with the dead. The damsel with "a spirit of divination" (Acts 16:16) was possessed by an evil spirit, or, as the words are literally rendered, "having a spirit, a pithon." The reference is to the heathen god Apollo, who was regarded as the god of prophecy.


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